The flowers in season for a New Zealand Wedding

Choosing the flowers for your wedding is an important step. Find what flowers are in season when you get married with our handy seasonality chart!

Nothing beats the scent of real flowers. I love it so much that one of my dreams during high school was to work as a florist.

I can’t help but be happy with a bunch of fresh flowers in the house.  They have so much meaning – I’m sorry, congratulations, just because – but never do you buy so many flowers as for your wedding day.

But when deciding what flowers you’d like for your wedding, where do you start?!

Easy – with your wedding date.  When your wedding is, will dictate what flowers are in season, and available to purchase.

Why is it important to pick flowers in season?

Selecting wedding flowers in season gives you a beautiful bouquet that’ll last longer and cost you less. Or if you particularly love a certain bloom, then you might adjust your wedding date accordingly… I know I was very pleased that my September wedding could feature freesias and stock… my favourites!

If something is out of season, then your flowers are going to cost you more (if your florist can even purchase them) and they won’t last as long.  

Think of how tart strawberries are at the beginning of the season, compared to how juicy and delicious they are right around Christmas… it’s the same concept.

Flowers in season and available in New Zealand

Check out the diagram below to figure out which flowers will work for you.

Remember that even if the guide below says it’s in season, flower availability varies according to the weather we are having, and the area you’re in, so double-check with your florist!

There are even more flowers available that aren’t listed here, or that may be able to be imported in especially (such as frangipani), so it always pays to establish a relationship with your wedding florist early.  

They know their stuff, so it’s worth talking to them about the overall look you are going for – they may be able to suggest different blooms that’ll give you a similar look.

Other things to consider when choosing wedding flowers

Cost

A bridal bouquet can set you back a few hundred dollars so you may wonder, what are the cheapest flowers for a wedding bouquet?

Choosing flowers in season will automatically save you some costs, but there are certain flowers that in general are a more cost-effective option. For example:

  • Big flowers like hydrangeas or proteas – With their huge flower heads, you don’t need many to make a statement.
  • Carnations, snapdragons, gerberas. – These are available year round too
  • Roses – Available to purcahse year round too, roses can be a cost-effective flower especially if you buy in bulk!

If there are some more expensive flowers you have your eye on, pair them with a cheaper option to keep costs down, or add in greenery to bulk out the bouquet.

Pollen

Some flowers are beautiful but messy! You don’t want pollen staining your clothes or table settings, or setting off any allergies! For example, Sunflowers are one that is so striking but contains a lot of pollen! There are pollen-free varieties too, usually grown for wedding bouquets so you could check that with your florist.

Lillies are another. They are beautiful but many varieties contain a lot of pollen. Removing the pollen covered stamen from the middle of the flower can help.

Colour

Do your flowers match your wedding theme or motif?

How well does the flower hold up

This is an important thing to consider, especially if your wedding is at a hot time of the year.

Blooms such as peonies, roses, proteas, gerberas and ranunculus can stand up to heat. Mix it in with hardy greenery like bay leaf and eucalyptus leaf. Avoid choosing flowers that are near the end of their blooming period. Choosing tight and younger flower heads means less chance of wilting.

What flowers are you having at your wedding?

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